A Reality Show for Start-ups: The Final Pitch

I am an avid fan of Shark Tank. I love watching Start-up pitch their ideas, even if some are super unprepared. I love seeing the different ideas that people have. Man, there are a lot of unique and creative ideas. I love taking note of the judges questions and I am always amazed at how good they are with numbers. I think Shark Tank is the only show that I watch where I have my notebook by my side to actually take down notes. You may laugh at me (haha!) but I do learn a lot from this show.

In my mind, the end goal really of the start-ups joining the show is either to raise capital (which is pretty normal) or to gain enough publicity to build traction. And for the rest of us watching the show, it’s really for our entertainment and education. Anything that I could learn from, I love!

Imagine my delight when I was invited to the Final Pitch press conference. I didn’t get to go (because I had to focus this week on Taxumo, but I decided to share it anyway. The Final Pitch is something like Shark Tank. The show will challenge entrepreneur contestants in every way — from exploring funding options, refining their business plans, and marketing their products and services. The show is set to air on History Channel this May, 2017

creator-of-the-final-pitch-john-aguilar-2

“The Final Pitch aims to help entrepreneurs find success by connecting them to investors who can finance them, and to mentors who can fine-tune their businesses—reducing risk factors and boosting growth potential and sustainability,” shares the creator and host of The Final Pitch, John Aguilar.

The show will make entrepreneurs go through a series of challenges that will test their creativity, motivation and character. At the same time, they will learn the secrets behind the success of their potential investors, who are also tasked to handpick the top finalists to proceed on the show.

L-R The Final Pitch creator John Aguilar, venture capitalist Jose ‘Jomag’ Magsaysay, CEO of MFT Group of Companies Mica Tan, Chairman and CEO of the Sterling Group of Companies and SL Agritech, Dr. Henry Lim Bon Liong, and Chairman and CEO of Catala Corporation Joseph Calata

L-R The Final Pitch creator John Aguilar, venture capitalist Jose ‘Jomag’ Magsaysay, CEO of MFT Group of Companies Mica Tan, Chairman and CEO of the Sterling Group of Companies and SL Agritech, Dr. Henry Lim Bon Liong, and Chairman and CEO of Catala Corporation Joseph Calata

For Jose ‘Jomag’ Magsaysay, founder of a well-loved global food brand and one of the investors on ‘The Final Pitch’, his picks for the show would be based on whether or not he can see them as future business partners. “I’m looking for people who deserve a break, as I believe in the person more than the business,” he shares.

self-made-billionaire-and-the-youngest-to-become-the-chairman-of-a-publicly-listed-company-in-the-pse-joseph-calata

Other investors include the multi-awarded Chairman and CEO of the Sterling Group of Companies and SL Agritech, Dr. Henry Lim Bon Liong; self-made billionaire and the youngest chairman of a publicly-listed company in the PSE, Joseph Calata; and lastly, 25-year old millennial CEO of the angel investing group MFT Group of Companies, Mica Tan.

In addition to the potential funding from the investors, contestants will receive business coaching from an esteemed lineup of mentors, who are composed of well-known business experts and inclusive business champions, namely Department of Trade and Industry Secretary, Mon Lopez; former President of MicroVentures, Inc., Senator Bam Aquino; Chairman of Start Up Village, Prof. Jay Bernardo and; President of the Ateneo Center for Entrepreneurship-Masters In Entrepreneurship (ACE-ME), Dr. Andy J. Ferreira, among others.

I think this is a good initiative, because (1) Filipinos need to see that there are a lot of opportunities out there — opportunities to solve problems, opportunities to innovate and opportunities to make a difference; (2) We need to stir up the start-up ecosystem in the Philippines and having more publicity for the entire industry is good (in that way, we, startups won’t have to explain what we actually do, especially to our friends and parents. haha!);  and lastly, (3) We need to strive to be better than we are and let go of that “okay na ako” attitude. We, Filipinos, are very talented individuals and it’s such a waste to see people full of potential not maximize their talents and skills.

So there, these are the reasons why I, personally think, that we need shows and other activities like this. Will we join this competition and represent Taxumo? Maybe. We will have to think about it! haha!

But for those who are ready to join, here are some details:

To join The Final Pitch, applicants will be required to fill up and submit an online entry form to The Final Pitch via its official website www.TheFinalPitch.ph Deadline for submission of entries is until March 17, 2017. Investors interested in becoming a part of the show or investing in the entrepreneurs behind the scenes may also get in touch with The Final Pitch through through its website.

*The Final Pitch’ is produced by Streetpark Productions Inc., the company behind the longest-running real estate and construction TV show Philippine Realty TV. For more info and for sponsorship and partnership inquiries, visit www.TheFinalPitch.ph or call 0917-8136674.

Goodluck to all my readers who want to join! Message me so that we can all watch you!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Pinterest

Businesses for Couples to Start: An Interview with Jeff & Ingrid of Stationer Extraordinaire

interviews-with-business-owners

I met up with a couple who wanted to to share with me what their business was. It was perfect! I get a lot of inquiries about what types of businesses for couples to start that can give them financial success and happiness (awww…). I was truly inspired by this couple that I met. They made me thing about making my interviews with new businesses as regular as possible. I dub Thursdays to be the BE INSPIRED DAY! haha!

Every Thursday (hopefully), I plan to continue the tradition of interviewing startups and small businesses all around the globe! Yes, I definitely said ALL AROUND THE WORLD! I will interview single people, who found it challenging to uproot themselves from their current mindset. These people launched a successful business. We will learn from married couples who have amazing tips on businesses for couples to start. I will meet and interview tech start-up founders. Interviewing these tech-y peeps is so cool. Every Thursday will be such a happy and inspiring day!

So going back, today’s topic is a classic example of one of the businesses for couples to start. Jeff and Ingrid have been married for 10 years. They decided to put up a retail business called Stationer Extraordinaire. With only a few months into it, this lovely and cute couple share their experience as a couple in running a business together — a business that is in its early stages.

Jeff and Ingrid of Stationer Extraordinaire

Jeff and Ingrid of Stationer Extraordinaire

Check out this interview with Jeff and Ingrid if you are interested in getting into a retail business or to know what happens when couples go into business together. By the way, this interview is a part of the Pay it Forward Facebook Live sessions brought to you by Payoneer Philippines and the Work in Freedom community. We, at the work in Freedom community, will be doing this on a monthly basis!

Sharing this video interview which I uploaded on GTV (wooohooo! It’s alive again!).

It was one of the most fun interviews I had. We really had a great time laughing and sharing thoughts! Hope you learned a lot! Share with us what new insights or realizations you had after watching this video. Feel free to comment on the video in Youtube!

For more information about Yumi Journals and Kaweco Fountain Pens:

Website: https://www.stationerextraordinaire.com/

WiF Banner 720 x 90 px

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Pinterest

Business Lessons: Cost and Volume

Today, I had a class on COSTS and the relationship of cost and volume. Starting a business means that you won’t be escaping this concept anytime soon. In order to manage and sustain a business, we need to monitor and control costs, because ultimately, to increase profits, you need to increase revenue and decrease costs while maintaining the value of your service.

Understanding costs

Now one of the things we need to look at is the behavior of costs. Here are the three behaviors:

VARIABLE – These are the costs that are directly proportional to the volume (level of activity).

FIXED – These are costs that you incur whether there is volume or not.

MIXED OR SEMI VARIABLE – These are costs that have a variable component and a fixed component. A classic example of this are utilities and manpower (when employees who receive pay but sometimes go overtime).

To be able to make profit, we need to increase volume to be sold to increase sales.

So how do we increase volume and sales?
1. Look for the customers who find value in availing your product.
2. Deliver great service so that your customers will be brand believers. This will be FREE advertising for your company.
3. Pray for sales!

Learning about Costs

Now there is this term, Full Cost which is Unit Variable Cost + Unit Fixed Cost.

Total Variable Cost increases as volume goes up but Unit Variable Cost is constant on a per unit basis.

Total Fixed Cost remains constant as the volume goes up, but Unit Fixed cost decreases on a per unit basis. With this, you are trying to achieve what you call Economies of Scale. This is the reason why we can give discounts when people order in bulk or in huge volume. Check different tiers so that you would know at what volume you will start to earn a margin.

The next term that I learned is Contribution Margin. Contribution Margin is the difference between sales and total variable costs or the difference between selling price and unit variable cost. This margin covers (or supposed to cover) for your fixed cost. Contribution Margin Ratio is Contribution Margin divided by Sales.

You need to find out where the biggest margin is. If you find out that the segments that you are tapping all bring in the same margin, look for the segment that will bring in the most volume.

I wanted to share these things. I just thought of sharing it, since I think it will be useful for startups and entrepreneurs to understand. Hope this helps!

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Pinterest

It Takes a Village to Raise a Business

For parents, we are all familiar with this statement “It takes a village to raise a child”. I just had a thought the other day while having our weekly check-up meeting with Ideaspace (entity behind the acceleration program we are part of), that the same is true with businesses. We were talking about the value proposition of Taxumo (our startup). In the room, EJ (my husband and CEO), yours truly, Manny and Prim (mentors) and Dustin and Brenda (from Ideaspace) were all pitching ideas and sharing experiences to further solidify our VP, and it was nice to see that everyone was so involved! There was a moment when I stopped and looked at all of them, and thought it takes a village to raise a business, too!

It takes a village to raise a business.

For the longest time, I always thought that there wasn’t anything difficult about putting up a business. Once you overcome that fear and just start turning your concept into reality, it should be that easy. Basically, a business is just a great idea that we implement and that’s it. Making Manila Workshops successful even further strengthened my belief that it’s all about jumping and fast execution. Boy, was I wrong!

In the past year, I have grown leaps and bounds in terms of learning more about putting up a business, and this is because I was open to hearing from other people. There are a lot of things that I see and wished that I could have done better for Manila Workshops. The good thing though is that I could still adjust now and make everything better than how it was. And the other thing is that I could apply what I have learned with this new startup, Taxumo. To tell you honestly, I haven’t had this much clarity as to what I need to do with my business, and this clarity was because I never let anything pass me by (both good or negative inputs about the business).

But being open means also looking at the value of these things. As a startup founder, you need to decipher if these inputs are things that are valuable or things that are not. There are plethora of tools that were explained and given to me by mentors, by our classes,etc. and most of them are available online. These tools are mostly used for validating the need of the customer. The old me would have said, “Doesn’t this lead to analysis-paralysis?”, but since I have seen the value of this process and the value of each tool (from Business Canvas, to QFD, to the Kano model, to strat mapping and usability tests, etc.), I, together with the team, of course, go through each one. As a team, you should talk to each other and discuss what you think are the insights, tips and tools that would make sense for your business.

Being open to listen doesn’t really equate to action or reaction for most of us. For example, even if most of these are readily available online and even if we know that we need to talk to the customers, we are so preoccupied with the idea that our business idea is just so amazing that we think who would not want to purchase or use it? I have been a victim of this (lol!) — in a few business that I have started, which eventually failed. I learned my lesson the hard way, and by validating the need even before you launch it may be the wisest way to go, so that you don’t waste time and effort. You can not know your customer enough. Each day should be a day to look for new insights about the customer.

There is this article from Forbes Magazine that’s circulating the web and it’s the fact that only 10% of the startups make it. Sharing the article here: 90% Of Startups Fail: Here’s What You Need To Know About The 10% This is a very good read!

Just wanted to share my thoughts on this, so go and talk to people. See what they think about your product. You’ll learn a lot from talking to the “villagers”.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Pinterest

Business Lessons You should Know before you Reach 30

After being chosen as one of the top 10 startups for Ideaspace 2016 Cohort 4 last Friday, I wanted to write about our experience, but I decided to write about another topic instead. I wanted to write about business lessons you should know before you reach 30 and about maturity, and this is not about being old, but this more about “business” maturity (although, oftentimes it comes with age). I decided to write about this since I have seen a lot of young people deciding to start a business before they reach 30, which is just AWESOME! I am all for it, but please do read up, learn, interview people, ask around, validate your idea, etc. before you jump the gun.

From my observation of people who have started a business, from both those who have succeeded and failed in keeping it afloat financially, I have noticed a lot of similarities. These lessons (I suppose I could call them that), I feel, would help a lot of younger people in making sounder and wiser decisions. Again, these are all from my personal observations.

One: If you are in the process of finding yourself (quarter life crisis) and are still figuring out what you want, being involved in a startup or let alone, leading one, is not the wisest thing to do. I see that the successful startups are led by people with a pretty good idea of what they want in life (and believe me, being just plain ‘rich’ or being the next Steve Jobs just doesn’t count). They are headstrong, but not stubborn about things. These are two different things and be aware of the difference. Starting a business means that people will look to you, especially if you are the CEO, for direction and you will probably fail at being a leader if you haven’t got your business figured out, let alone your life.

Maturity is seen in founders who know when to drop things temporarily to fight a better fight in the future.

Two: Successful founders know that money doesn’t make the world go round, but they know that money pays for the bills. You probably saw a lot of pictures of your friends who were part of Ideaspace 4 with big checks like these.

Zeeka 2

Well, the feeling of making it to top 10 was similar to probably winning the lotto, but the reasons for being elated were very different. All of us (I hope!) understood that this money was gasoline for our business. It was more to fast track things internally that would make us launch the product within this 4.5 month duration. Although, even if founders understand the purpose of grants and funding, they sometimes fall into the trap of using the funds themselves for a lot of unnecessary expenses, and what unnecessary doesn’t mean giving yourself pay that is due you. Unnecessary things or spending are things that you may not actually need, but end up paying for, and this oftentimes, stem from poor planning.

Maturity is seen in founders who know what they are worth, and who are smart enough to have thought of a financial plan for the business even before funds start coming in. The attractiveness of money/funding will not lure them into the habit of overspending.

Three: I am an advocate of working remotely or working from home, but for businesses that are just starting, I would have to say that it is crucial that you meet face-to-face regularly. Believe me, I have seen the difference that this makes in a lot of instances and scenarios. For CEOs or for the leaders of these startups especially, it is very important that you are with your team often. A wise friend told me once that the leaders or the founders of the “idea” would have an incomparable amount of passion that would be infectious and that would be enough for the entire team to function with gusto. I believe this to be true, as I have personally experienced this. In the business that I run, I see that people draw inspiration from me and in the businesses/startups that I am part of, I draw inspiration and energy from the founder of the idea.

Maturity is seen in founders who know when they need to be there for their team, and when to let go for the business and the team to grow speedily.

Four: Your unique selling proposition is not only the uniqueness of your idea. An idea can be the same as someone else’s but executed better. An idea can be really unique also and totally different from anything else that you might have seen and encountered, but the pain point is not evident or the timing is off. So, really think about what will set you apart, and why will people avail of your service and not that of another entity. Don’t be scared to share your idea with the right people (do your research and look for people with experience in the industry that you want to enter or those who your peers say would be willing to give genuine advice). And when these more experienced people give you advice, have an open mind about it, but also, think things through to know what will make the most sense for your business.

Maturity is seen in founders who embrace the concept of abundance (of ideas, advice, collaborations, information) and discern for themselves which of these information will make sense for their business.

Five: You will fail many times along the way. You will get disheartened not only a few times, but an amazingly whole lot of times. I can’t count the number of times I have cried or the number of times I have not slept, but there were a lot. You should know that this is normal. It’s also good to have someone by your side who truly understands what you are going through.

Maturity is seen in founders who know that hard times make you tougher, and the challenges are not indications that you need to quit, but indications that you need to step a little bit further from your business to see where improvement lies.

Six: Last, but not the least, focus on things that make sense now, while thinking of the bigger picture and your reasons why. I’m not sure though if telling Millenials to go for what they are passionate about and to strive to make a difference is still relevant, since it seems everyone is talking about this already and it seems that these come natural to this new generation. But, what I wanted to harp on is for you to know think about what makes sense now. Will it make more sense to gather knowledge as an employee then possibly start your own business later on? Will it make more sense to start early and continuously learn along the way? Will it make sense to focus on building one startup with a friend and have a part-time stable job on the side? Will it make more sense to study more first to build confidence then start a business?

Maturity is seen in founders who know that there are many decisions that you must make on the road to building your own business. You make them after thoroughly assessing the situation, and ultimately, accept whatever the consequence of that decision is.

These are just some of the things that I thought about over the weekend. I have other thoughts that I want to document, but I’ll just save it for yet another day! If you have thoughts about this that you want to share, or questions that you want to ask, please leave a comment below. Today is yet another busy day for me, but I hope that my moments of reflection and journaling it, helped!

Talk to you soon!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Pinterest

Unbreakable… It’s a Miracle

I had my own full dose of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt yesterday. I wanted something to watch to cheer me up.

Today’s topic is actually about challenges in Business. Yesterday, I felt so bad about something that I did or rather, I failed to do, for one of my businesses. I really thought I did something, but it turns out, I missed doing it, which made me feel so so bad and sad for my team.

But with that challenge, I learned a lot of lessons, which I know will help others, too, who are going through the same thing:

1. It’s okay to feel bad and just let it out. It’s okay to cry about it. It doesn’t make you weak. It just makes you human.

2. Surrounding yourself with “good vibes” is key. You will feel tremendous weight on your shoulders (I felt I couldn’t breathe yesterday), but look for positivity. It was a good thing my meetings yesterday were with inspiring and energetic people!

3. If something for work important to you, check and double check your work. Even if it’s not your own task, check up on it yourself. Because of my experience, I spent the day yesterday checking up on each person in my company. Haha!

4. Missing one detail or failing to do one task, doesn’t make you incompetent. Leaders, too, must know how to deal with people who commit errors. If one fails to do something or lapses on something, taking responsibilities away from that individual, just makes it all worse. It just makes the person demotivated and they’re left feeling incapable.

5. Teamwork is very important. I told my team yesterday that no matter who makes a mistake, we need to stick up for one another and not bring them down. In times of failure, we need to be more sensitive to people who failed to complete a task, especially if it was an honest mistake.

6. In times of challenges like this, you will definitely know who your real friends are. They will not judge you and will help you move on.

7. Realize that it’s just work. The bigger picture is that you keep strong relationships with your co-workers, stakeholders, key partners and your employees. Again, as I always say, business is about managing relationships.

8. Tomorrow is another day. Be unbreakable, like Kimmy Schimdt. It will be a new day.

So, these are the things that I learned yesterday. Today is a new day and I’m excited for it! Let’s go for our dreams! Every day is a miracle!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Pinterest

That Thing Called Pagibig… That Thing Called Negosyo

I was in the shower a few minutes ago and I was thinking about business, relationships and breakups. I was thinking about it since me and my single friends were talking about it last night. It has been years since my last break-up and I must say, all of my break-ups were uneventful, except probably the first one. For those of you who know me or for those of you who constantly read my blog, you would probably know that I’m not really that emotional about stuff anymore. Don’t get me wrong. I used to be super emotional. My sister would call me the drama queen, since my life was one big drama.

I don’t know. I guess things changed. Now, my life is all about business and helping other people. I guess, I just got sick and tired of all the drama in my life.

That thing called

Now, a while ago, weird as it may sound, I was thinking of some analogies of business and relationships. In my head, I was looking at different types of people and I was going through different scenarios and thinking of how business and relationships are alike in many ways.

Types of People

Analogy #1:
Business: There are people who invest so much into a business and get super disappointed when there is little return on investment or no return at all.

Relationships: There are people who invest so much into relationships and get disappointed when they give more into the relationship than their partners.

Analogy #2:
Business: There are people who start out super excited with a business idea and concept and give it all they have got. But somewhere along the way, they realize that it’s not something that they want to do anymore.

Relationships: There are people who fall head over heels in-love and the first few years are like heaven on earth. But somewhere along the way, they realize that what they felt was just infatuation and that they were just in love with the idea of love.

Analogy #3:
Business: There are people who just want to keep on doing the things that they are doing and just don’t want to start their own business. They are happy that way.

Relationships: There are people who decide that they don’t want to go into any kind of relationship, even marriage. They are just happy being single.

Analogy #4:
Business: There are people who are happy with the business that they have started even if they have bumps and a lot of huge challenges along the way. They just get through it and deal with it. Lucky bastards!

Relationships: There are people who are happy with the relationship or marriage that they have. They may encounter a lot of little and even huge challenges, but in the end, they still survive, make it work and are happy with their decision.

Analogy #5:
Business: There are people who are stuck in a business because they have already signed the SEC and legal documents. They just pretend and work half-heartedly to make the business work and survive just to get by.

Relationships: There are people who have decided to settle down and stand path with the decision to marry that they made since they know it’s a commitment. Even if they aren’t happy anymore, what can they do, right?

Analogy #6:
Business: There are people who just created a business, but feel like something is missing or they feel impatient waiting for their ROI. They then tend to dabble into other different businesses just to see if they can get something out from those other endeavors.

Relationships: There are people who are in current relationships, but who feel that something is missing or that they can’t wait for marriage anymore. They then feel that they need to still look around and play the field, just in case there is someone out there who’s a better match for them.

Scenarios:

Ang pag-ibig parang negosyo…

– Minsan alam mo na ngang charity work, gusto mo paring i-pursue.
– Kumakapit ka lang as business idea mo kasi natatakot kang wala ka nang maisip na iba.
– Alam mo na ngang lugi ka, pero ayaw mong bitawan kasi mawawalan ka na ng negosyo at akalain ng tao, petiks ka nalang.
– Alam mo na ngang mali yung business idea mo at di ka kikita pero go lang kasi masaya ka naman.
– Alam mo na ngang mali yung pinili mong business partner, pero di ka na umatras kasi may SEC registration na at pumirma na sya.
– Alam mo na ngang gusto ng potential partner mo bumalik sa corporate world, pilit ka parin ng pilit na magnegosyo kayo together.
– Alam mo na ngang malulugi ka, umiyak ka parin at di ginawan ng paraan.
– Alam mo na ngang di maganda yung dynamics nyo ng business partner mo, niyaya mo parin sya sa bagong negosyo mo.
– Dasal ka ng dasal na sana magwork ang business mo pero di ka naman nagwo-work. Haller?
– Nagtitiis ka i-figure out kung paano mag-flafly yung business mo, kasi maganda sa papel at pitch deck (gusto mo talaga syang gawin), kaso wala talagang market.
– Gustong gusto mo yung business idea, kaso may nakagawa na… awww.

Haha! Sharing some #hugotsss lang this Monday afternoon 🙂

Do you want to share more #hugots? Pwede naman. Haha!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Pinterest

Why you should Enter Entrepreneurship? Check out this Webinar Series

The buzz word nowadays is Entrepreneurship. It seems like everyone is going that route. Everyone wants to get into it. Everyone’s starting their own businesses. Every one wants to be called an Entrepreneur.

I’ve thought about why people should try to “enter entrepreneurship” and here are some of the reasons why:

1) Control your one time — control your own life!
Being an entrepreneur doesn’t mean that you will have less work. In fact, during the first year of business, you might be the busiest that you’ll ever be. But the nice thing about being an entrepreneur is that you actually have more control over your time. You can move schedules around. This is what I actually love about my life now. If I don’t feel like working, I don’t get up. I just see to it though, that I accomplish things and that I always see results.

2) Unlimited Opportunities to Earn and to Learn
I used to think (especially when I was about to resign from my job) that I would be a bored individual, just going through the daily grind of creating workshops and writing for my blog and other entities. I used to think that I wouldn’t be able to meet a lot of people as the way I did when I was employed. I’m a people person so I love going out and conversing with others. But when I became an entrepreneur, I got to widen my network four-fold. Almost every day, I get to meet a new person, in person or virtually. I receive at least two to three emails from people I don’t know every day. If you multiply that, that’s at least 1095 new people a year!

But what I genuinely love about meeting new people is that I get to learn new things! I see meetings as an opportunity to learn and to widen my knowledge about different things. Being an entrepreneur allowed me to go out there and look for new acquaintances and learn more new stuff!

3) Allow you to do the things that you want so you can leave a Legacy!

I don’t know if you saw this episode for GTV: Love the Leap recently.

I talked about leaving a legacy, which I realized after reading Stephen Covey’s 8th habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness. I honestly believe that all of us are meant for greatness. When we pass away, I’m sure that each one of us want to be remembered for something — a loving mom, a great educator, an admirable social entrepreneur, but all of these things stem from the fact that we had a goal of making the world a better place and we helped by using our talents. Everyday, we help make the world a better place the best we know how. Being an entrepreneur makes you think about this every day. With the business that I have, how can I add value?

These three things are just a few reasons why I think people should try to enter entrepreneurship. For those who are already entrepreneurs, they know that there are a lot of things that you need to learn in order to sustain the business that you have. For skills and things that you don’t know about, it’s good to know at least the basics so that even if you decide to outsource in the end, you still have a good understanding on how things work.

With this, Burn Gutierrez and I decided to come up with a Webinar Series called Enter Entrepreneurship with topics that we know you would love to learn about!

Enter Entrepreneurship

Enter Entrepreneurship

This webinar series is composed of 10 topics:

Understanding WordPress – July 18, 2015 with Jerome Esperanza
Basics of Photoshop – July 25, 2015 with Amanda De Ocampo
Setting up an Online Store – August 1, 2015 with Fitz Villafuerte
Product Shots with a Purpose – August 8, 2015 with Shiela Catilo
Basics of Shooting a Video – August 15, 2015 with Dennis Abad
Basics of Video Editing – August 22, 2015 with Jeo Paz
Facebook Marketing – August 29, 2015 with Peter Juan
Digital Marketing – Sept. 5, 2015 with Ros Juan
Content Planning – Sept. 12, 2015 with Rey Baguio
Blog and Creative Writing – Sept. 19, 2015 with Martine De Luna

The cost of all the 10 workshops is at Php 10,000, but if you opt to choose just some, each session is at Php 1999. If you avail of the 10 sessions, you will get access to my Love the Leap Checklist and a free 11th session on Productivity and Management from Sonny Del Rosario.

Freebie Image

 

I really hope that you could sign up for this very beneficial webinar series! You can sign up by clicking on this link:

http://manilaworkshops.com/events/enter-entrepreneurship

For those who want to know more about our speakers, here are their profiles!

Amanda De Ocampo

Dennis Abad Fitz Villafuerte Jeo Paz Jerome Esperanza Martine De Luna Rey Baguio Sheila Catilo Sonny Del Rosario

Sign up now at http://manilaworkshops.com/events/enter-entrepreneurship

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Pinterest