With the spread of COVID-19, schools had to either close early or move their curriculum online. For my daughter, it was the latter. We had to set aside time to teach her the lessons given by the teachers. I actually enjoyed doing this with her. I immediately thought of how schools were affected (if they were) and how can we help these schools ran by our fellow MSMEs. For today, I’ll be sharing the story of Carsoncrest International School.

About Carsoncrest International School

Zeeka at Carsoncrest International School

Carsoncrest International School educates children of any nationality, race, or culture with programs ranging from preschool to senior high school.  It believes that children learn best when multidisciplinary, play-based, investigative, experiential, and practical approaches are used and supported with appropriate technologies that enhance the fun of learning and gaining knowledge. 

It also partners with parents to nurture their children into highly motivated, globally competent, academically excellent, and values driven lifelong learners.  Thus, it positions itself as a progressive institution that supports a multi-faceted philosophy in educating the young.  For its stockholders, it seeks aggressive growth and maximum returns at any location it decides to be.  While for its employees, it promises meaningful human development and adequate compensation.

I was lucky enough to talk to Carol Del Rosario, the woman behind Carsoncrest International School and asked her about running a business in the time of COVID-19.

Ginger: Can you describe your business model, Carol, and how were you impacted by the spread of the virus and the Enhanced Community Quarantine?

Carol: Like any school, we earn by collecting tuition fees. Right now, we can’t accept inquiries and enrollees in the school.

Ginger: How can people help you moving forward? What kind of help are you looking for? 

Carol: Right now, we are looking for ways to accept online enrollment. We’d also want to ask for people to spread the word about Carsoncrest International School.

Ginger: Because of the things happening now, what changes will you be implementing in your business? 

Carol: With these things happening, we’re thinking of implementing work at home or trying out home school (integrated with our curriculum) 2-3 times a week.

Ginger: What are the business lessons that you have learned from this? 

Carol: One of the things that we learned form this is that we should have contingency measures of moving everything online when situations like this happen.

Ginger: Thank you so much, Carol! I continue to wish you luck and success. I hope that parents consider enrolling their kids in your school. I’ve seen you and your school take good care of the kids who are there, and I’m sure parents who are reading this will want to support you after this crisis ends.

Let’s help support Carsoncrest International School. Please visit their website: http://carsoncrestinternationalschool.org/index.html

Instagram: https://instagram.com/carsoncrestinternationalschool

FB Page: https://facebook.com/carsoncrestinternationalschool

Twitter: https://twitter.com/carsoncrestinternationalschool

Stay safe!

P.S. Please follow https://www.facebook.com/groups/BounceBackPH/ to see how you can support the Philippines.

P.P.S. Please follow #BounceBackforBusiness #GInspiration #GoLocalPH for more Local SME and Professional stories that we can support!

P.P.S. If you want to be featured next, please visit this link https://mommyginger.com/smes-and-professionals-unite-during-this-time-of-crisis.html and for Women Founders, please visit this website and sign up: http://startupwomenconnect.asia/

Not doing anything at home? I’ve already shared with you that I take courses at SkillShare (just click on this link for a two month free subscription). But to also help out our kababayans and to support locally made course, I have come across this course. You may want to try Freelance Writing. This course is called Freelance Writing Side Gig FWSG): Road to Success program.

Try Freelance Writing!

All you need to do is set aside one hour every day and learn about the freelance writing. The Freelance Writing Side Gig: Road to Success program is perfect for people who want to upskill while spending time at home during the quarantine period for Covid19.

If you are looking to be freelance writer, this course will help you check on what you already have and from there, Charlyn Awing, the creator of this course will teach you specific skills to level up and enhance your unique knowledge so that you can attract your dream clients.

Also, you will learn proven strategies on how to start a freelance writing side gig even if you are BUSY.

Discover Charlyn’s past failures and mistakes became an instrument for me to attract and get hired by my dream clients.

Get mentored also by a passionate and committed accountability partner who believes in your capability and keeps reminding you that YOU CAN while guiding you like a mom!

Charlyn Awing, the creator of this course, also mentioned that before she launched FWSG, she passionately trained 80 Beta Testers for a period of 2 weeks because she wanted to prove its effectiveness. She focused mainly on the Mindset and Focus part (which now comprises Module 1 of the full course), and here are just some of what the challengers said:

“My major problem was I didn’t know where or how to start Freelance writing. Now, there is more clarity to achieve my goal in Freelance writing. Before, I wanted to do a lot of things but this course helped me summarize and pinpoint my strengths and weakness. Overall, the time was well spent. The videos are informative and the activities help a lot by breaking down one’s strength in writing and makes you realize where you should focus on. Mother Ant’s video was engaging from start to finish. I made sure that the environment was less distracting so that I won’t miss any important advice. She’s also inspiring and encouraging especially to newbies that want to pursue a freelancing writing career.” – Dianne

“My major problem was insecurity and very little idea about freelance writing. I started researching about freelancing way back 2018 and I joined groups/network to help me get started. I kept trying until other opportunities came and I gave up freelancing. After the course, I realized that I’m actually cut to be a writer. Wow! I know now that I can be more than my experience of writing reports. More than that, I’m excited to go and start my dream. I know that along the way, I will encounter defeats, mistakes, and insecurities. But my courage will always be sourced from my humble beginning in our lesson 1. I will remember that “Mother Ant” rooted for me, and if she believed in me, why shouldn’t I? The course was personal! Like finding a jeans that fits you so well, it was almost tailored fit!” – Joanne

If you want to know more about the creator, you can check MotherAnt and follow here here: https://facebook.com/motherantcharlynjune

Please do check out her course at: https://motherant.com/freelance-writing-course/ The course will start this coming April 13 so hope you can read and consider this course.

If you have any questions about the course, just reach out to Charlyn Awing: https://motherant.com 🙂

Feel free to share this with other people who want to try this and to earn from home.

There are friends that you meet who are always ready to lend helping hand whenever you need it. Amidst the chaos in social media, there are a lot of good news and positivity going around. One of the kindest and helpful people that I know is Tina from Mama V Delicious.

More than a week ago, my friend whose family runs a hospital called out for help. They were in need of PPEs, food, etc. I helped them and called out for help from friends, and one of the people who quickly responded was Tina Vitas, the owners of Mama V Delicious.

The food industry is one of those who are badly hit by this epidemic. Big food chains and home based businesses like Mama V Delicious are all equally affected. This is because of the disruption in the supply chain — ingredients are hard to come by these days.

Let’s get to know more about Mama V Delicious

Ginger: Hi Tina! Can you tell our readers what your business is?

Tina: Mama V Delicious is an online food delivery business. I spent 17 years in the United States. I, then, decided to come back home to the Philippines in 2004. My mother (Mama V) and I (Tina V) decided to open a restaurant called Mama V Restaurant on the Ground Floor of Providence Tower, 2471 Leon Guinto Street, corner Estrada, Malate, Manila.

Then around August/September 2018, we started Mama V Delicious. Our mission is to bring my Mom, Mama V’s 60-year old recipes cooked with passion & love to a wider audience. It is a related, but a separate business from Mama V Restaurant which we started in March 2004.

Ginger: Can you describe your business model? How can you earn? 

Tina: Offerings are Single Servings, Party Trays, Dine At Home and Set Packages. We are a company, earning both through good volumes of orders (that is the goal) and a well thought out margin.

Ginger: How were you impacted by this pandemic and by the Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ)? 

Tina: Business slowed first and then picked up. The challenge now is finding ingredients & supplies.

Ginger: How can people help you moving forward? What kind of help are you looking for?

Tina: We need to have more options for suppliers for all our ingredients, particularly ones that can deliver. This is very crucial in times like these! We, of course, are still in the process of getting known through social media marketing, PR & the help of influencers. Spreading the word to other people that we exist will help a lot.

Ginger: Because of the things happening now, what changes will you be implementing in your business? 

Tina: To have more payment options online, to upgrade other financial accounts related to business to be online, to use more online tools for operations, to be more on top of stocking of fast moving items, to give monthly incentives to employees based on their performance and the company’s sales.

Ginger: What are the business lessons that you have learned from this pandemic of Corona Virus?

Tina: How can we be more inclusive and socially responsible (as best as we can be) in our respective businesses that value goes from us, to our employees, to our clients and to the marginalized in society? I think the last few decades have seen too much hoarding of resources that created such insane levels of inequality in most parts of the world. The much awaited reset button is here. I hope we all use it wisely!

Ginger: Thank you so much, Tina! I really hope that businesses think of inclusion and become more socially responsible after this. More power to you and your company!

Please support her by visiting her website and social media accounts: http://www.mamavdelicious.com

@mamavdelicious.ph on Instagram

Mama V Delicious Meals on Facebook

Stay safe!

P.S. Please follow https://www.facebook.com/groups/BounceBackPH/ to see how you can support the Philippines.

P.P.S. Please follow #BounceBackforBusiness #GInspiration #GoLocalPH for more Local SME and Professional stories that we can support!

P.P.S. If you want to be featured next, please visit this link https://mommyginger.com/smes-and-professionals-unite-during-this-time-of-crisis.html and for Women Founders, please visit this website and sign up: http://startupwomenconnect.asia/

Looking out my window here in BGC, I don’t see any movement. This enhanced community quarantine has turned this hustling and bustling place into a quiet and somewhat eerie neighborhood. Weirdly so, I miss seeing people and cars.

This got me thinking about the Auto Industry. How are businesses in this industry doing. Fortunately, Automart.ph, one of the startups in this environment is the hero of my feature today. Here is my interview with the founder of Automart.ph, Poch Ceballos.

Ginger: Hi Poch! Can you tell readers more about Automart.ph?

Poch: We sell used and repossessed cars at prices far cheaper than what you can get from most dealers and marketplaces. We follow a strict “no patong” or no premium over what the suppliers sell the units for, so you’re assured that you get the lowest rates possible always.

Poch Ceballos from Automart.ph

While buying a brand new car is always a nice goal – and the brand new smell can be intoxicating – it’s simply not a practical choice especially with a global recession looming. Automart.Ph has a lot of almost-new and very high quality cars, at around 30-50% lower prices vs brand new cars. That’s the practical way to go about it. We have branches and car lots in QC, Paranaque, Cebu and Davao.

Ginger: I agree with that during this time, it may be wise to really think about purchases and having this option from Automart.ph for buying cars is great. So tell us, why did you start your business? And what is your mission? 

Poch: Our mission is to provide Assets for All. We provide practical, low-cost options for Filipinos nationwide, especially for items that are normally very expensive, like cars.

Ginger: To give people insights on different business models out there, can you describe your business model?

Poch: We work with suppliers who need to sell cars and place their inventory on our site. In return, we get a small commission for every sale.

Ginger: So, Poch, everyone’s talking about the Pandemic. Can you share how was Automart.ph and you as a founder impacted by this pandemic both or either positively or negatively? Were you also impacted by the Enhanced Community Quarantine? 

Poch: Our folks are doing study-from-home, and we’re upskilling them so that once we’re ready to go back to work, they’ll have more and better skills.

Ginger: I love companies who give high regard for their employees. How about your company? How can people help you moving forward? What kind of help are you looking for? 

Poch: I’d love to encourage and ask them to buy used and repossessed cars from us, instead of brand new. It’s cheaper, kinder to the environment since nothing new is produced.

Ginger: Because of the things happening now, what changes will you be implementing in your business? 

Poch: We might be trading down – selling even lower-priced cars than before. We’ll also be working with more partners who need help disposing of their added inventory.

Ginger: To end this interview, Poch, what are the business lessons that you have learned from this? 

Poch: You must be able to weather sudden downturns – have enough reserves if possible, and be kind to your employees. If you can have them work from home or study from home, do so.

Ginger: Thank you so much and more power to Automart.ph.

For those interested in collaborating or purchasing, please visit: https://automart.ph

Facebook: https://facebook.com/automartph

Instagram: https://instagram.com/automartph

Thanks for reading these SME and local business features!

P.S. Please follow https://www.facebook.com/groups/BounceBackPH/ to see how you can support the Philippines.

P.P.S. Please follow #BounceBackforBusiness #GInspiration #GoLocalPH for more Local SME and Professional stories that we can support!

P.P.S. If you want to be featured next, please visit this link https://mommyginger.com/smes-and-professionals-unite-during-this-time-of-crisis.html

During situations like this, I’ve noticed that a lot of people flock to get news and information on Viber and other chat-based channels. Johanson Dy Cheng, the founder of www.entrepnegosyo.com and www.emarket.com.ph, is using his community to help others in this time of crisis.

Johan founded these websites to help share general and specific information regarding business and commerce needed by up-and-coming young entrepreneurs. These avenues for learning is not only a simple and
necessary networking tool, it also serves as a communication link for already well established and successful businessmen and tycoons, whether local or international.

About the Founder

Johan graduated from Jubilee Christian Academy in 1996 and from De La Salle University- College of Saint Benilde in 2000, with a Bachelor of Science degree, major in Industrial Design.

He is no stranger to hard work as values like this were passed on to him from parents and family that handles various business endeavors. He was an academically gifted student, and was chosen as one of the select industrial design delegates sent by his school to the Industrial Design Forum held in Sydney, Australia from 1999 to 2000 under the umbrella of the Biennial Congress of International Council of Societies of Industrial Design.
When he graduated in 2000, he was conferred as one of the Ten Most Outstanding Student Leaders of all school organizations with the COPS Bahaghari Award of De La Salle University.

While in college at the De La Salle University, he was cited and included five times in the Dean’s List.

His professional career spans both the private and volunteer sectors. His work in the private sector began immediately after his graduation from college, when he joined the family-owned House of Accessories, where
he assisted in handling inquiries and purchasing of products from different Asian countries. During this time, he was working simultaneously as a bank trainee with China Banking Corporation in the year 2000, focusing on the analysis of financial statements of companies obtaining loans.

For the next 13 years, he worked for the banking industry’s giants. Among them were Standard Chartered Bank from 2000-2005. He was pirated from by Citibank from 2005 to 2010, where he rose from the ranks of trainee to Customer Relationship Manager. All the experiences he accumulated during his days in banking prepared him for entrepreneurship.

About EntrepNegosyo

In 2005, Johanson started EntrepNegosyo, an information gateway intended for the Philippine business community. It provided business news, bulletins, research and technology advancements that helped promote entrepreneurship literacy. His aim was to create global impact by empowering young Filipino entrepreneurs to be leaders, and taking the initiative in finding community solutions.

A passionate advocate of entrepreneurship, he envisioned EntrepNegosyo to be a universal portal where start-up companies could utilize shared resources from partners across the globe. To date, EntrepNegosyo has
more than 5,000 start-up subscribers as well as Small and Medium Industries (SMEs) taking advantage of its easy-to-use portal.

On his EntrepNegosyo Facebook site, Johan has created a dynamic meeting ground that allows its voluminous membership to expand their businesses while networking with one another, through active social media interaction. Relevant and valuable daily business advice and bulletins are part of the EntrepNepsyo’s regular menu, as well as inspirational talks from featured speakers. His work today allows young Filipino entrepreneurs the information and support to start, to grow, to network and to succeed in their chosen business endeavors through direct exposure to the working opportunities offered in his two social media sites.

By pioneering this online Philippine business community page for Filipino entrepreneurs, Cheng was able to pursue his passion for web and industrial design. Johan considers it a rare opportunity to work at something that he is very passionate for. Apart from this, Johanson has also involved himself in several other ventures: As social media and business development head of Philip Leonard Furniture; as Vice-President for Business Information Technology at Real Estate HUB, LLC; and as Sales Representative at AutoKid Group of Companies. Johan’s career in the volunteer sector began in 2000, when he joined Junior Chamber International (JCI) Manila. Here he further honed his leadership abilities, becoming chairman for different standing committees. He was soon an invaluable, eager member, driven by his innate desire to be of assistance to everyone.

Johan’s Working Dream

It was during his years as a member of JCI Manila that he found his second calling —that of spending much of his time in humanitarian aid and development, onsite rescue and relief operations. He also found himself in resource mobilization for healthcare delivery. He assisted also in bolstering capacities of existing outposts for basic services.

He was drawn most to caring for children with disabilities, having realized that it was the most marginalized and ignored groups of children today, most especially those afflicted with cerebral palsy. It was then that he
decided to pursue a lifelong mission of uplifting the lives of children with disabilities in the Philippines by creating awareness, educating stakeholders and providing appropriate opportunities for development and a better life.

He started his spiritual ministry at a very early age, actively serving as a volunteer for the Christian Bible Church of the Philippines in his local community at Talayan Village, in Quezon City. A devout Christian, he has
since worked closely with various parishes and charitable institutions, including continuing support for the Christ Commission Fellowship composed by lay men and women who share God’s love and the Gospel.

Today, much of his ministry has been devoted to children with disabilities. He has made this his life’s work, going to hospitals to visit and pray with patients daily after work. He will usually take with him his friends from church and colleagues from JCI Manila to provide comfort and hope to the seriously ill.

Johan is like the “energizer bunny,” never running out of energy to do whatever he can in a day which seems to be lacking in hours for this workaholic who detests holidays. Johan seems to have mastered time
management to perfection. He sleeps only three to four hours daily as he always is on the go whenever he is called. He spends a lot of his time meeting with his “Golden Heart” team in looking for ways to further reach out to more children.

Can you describe your business model? How can you earn? 

Johan earns through domain reselling and through the e-commerce platform.

How were you impacted by this pandemic? How were you impacted by the Enhanced Community Quarantine? 

At this time, Johan says that there is no chance to do social networking and business networking. He would like to get the word out that SMEs can use the platforms that he has to promote their businesses.

How can people help you moving forward? What kind of help are you looking for? 

He wishes that people can share his websites to all business owners: www.entrepnegosyo.com and www.emarket.com.ph

Because of the things happening now, what changes will you be implementing in your business? 

He plans to add an online payment gateway so that people can pay online.

What are the business lessons that you have learned from this? 

Johan says that we need to educate people and businesses on having a contingency plan on how to earn online.

Spread the word about these two sites that can help local businesses:

www.entrepnegosyo.com

www.emarket.com.ph

Thanks for continuously reading my stories on local businesses!

P.S. Please follow https://www.facebook.com/groups/BounceBackPH/ to see how you can support the Philippines.

P.P.S. Please follow #BounceBackforBusiness #GInspiration #GoLocalPH for more Local SME and Professional stories that we can support!

P.P.S. If you want to be featured next, please visit this link https://mommyginger.com/smes-and-professionals-unite-during-this-time-of-crisis.html