As I was sitting in a panel for 4th year college students, I was also thinking about a lot of things, on top of which was thinking of how we, as parents, can we pretty much teach starting or creating a business to the kids of today.

In this country, the employment rate in January 2019  was estimated at 94.8 percent.  In January 2018, the employment rate was 94.7 percent. This data was from https://psa.gov.ph/content/employment-rate-january-2019-estimated-948-percent

Aside from just looking at the employment rate, I also look at the underemployment which was at 15.6%. With a population of 108 Million Filipinos (as of today May 2019), this means that 16.8 Million Filipinos are underemlployed and 5.6 Million are unemployed. This is still a pretty huge number.

Ever since we had Zeeka, my husband and I have been thinking of ways to help the country in this aspect. This is why Taxumo exists — to help business owners focus on growing the business and later on generate more jobs for the people in their community (to promote inclusive growth).

As I observed the kids and parents of today, I was quite happy to see that more and more parents are open to letting their children live the life that they want. Graduates now are more open to choosing a path that they would like to have, be it starting their own business, get into the arts, get into the workforce, grow in a corporate environment, etc. We really need to show our kids that they have a choice and they can be successful at they want to do especially if they love what they are doing.

Since my husband and I are both corporate employees who shifted into becoming entrepreneurs, a lot of parents ask us how do we actually teach our kids about entrepreneurship. How do we raise kids who would want to start their own business later on?

You can teach your kids certain skills, values and train them to adapt certain habits, but you cannot force them to start a business (also) if they don’t want to. Anyway, these are skills, values and habits can be used no matter what their choices are.

For Zeeka, these are the things that we do though. Obviously, I cannot say that we’ve been successful (because she’s just 6 years old! haha!), but I’m sharing our own experiences for the purposes of discussion and to get additional tips and advice from parents who are wiser than me 🙂

Encourage kids to explore and see the world and answer their questions.

We don’t stop her from trying out a lot of different things. She has tried gymnastics, sketching, vlogging, fast food kiddie crews, hiphop, theatre classes, joining in workshops, joining an engineering club, taekwondo, creating a prototype for an app, making pastries and selling them, going out for a walk and touching everything she sees, wall climbing, traveling and seeing different places, etc. And whenever she asks about things, we try as much as possible to answer these questions thoroughly. We believe that this is how she will learn and we, parents, are their best teachers.

We teach her to be observant. We show her the actions have effects. We encourage her to find out what these “effects” are. For example, she learned how to wash the dishes. One time, her hands were slippery and she dropped and broke a plate. She now knows what happens if she’s not careful when she washes.

Guide them with what they can watch and play with online

Zeeka, like any other kid, loves to watch videos on Youtube, Netflix and she love playing games on Roblox. What we do is we limit time for gadgets and we also monitor the things that she watches.

Have you heard of Gary Vaynerchuk? He and his team created a cartoon called Lil’ Vee! Check out the first episode.

I love how they used simple concepts and examples that kids could understand. For this particular episode of Lil’ Vee, there were numerous things that were taught that both kids and adults could understand and use — from where ideas come from, to product development, to customer validation, marketing and selling.

I can’t wait for the next episode. Check out the first episode, moms and dads!

Support them in times of Failure but Expect Quality Work

This is the time in their lives when kids need to learn how to fail and pick themselves up after. They will naturally try a lot of things, and they will possibly fail during the first few attempts, but our role as parents is to help and encourage them to do better. We’re not there to remind them of their failure and their mistakes, because they probably know that they already failed. We’re there to help them pick up from where they left off and support their decisions after.

But we should also expect quality work from the things that they want to do. There are moments when we tell Zeeka that she should try harder. We then focus on what she can do to improve, like “practice more, Zeeka” or “try again”. Our kids are more capable than we think they are.

Be more specific with your words.

This is where my husband is good at. She makes Zeeka understand how she feels and gives her the word for it. He also encourages more specific language at home. Some examples of words that Zeeka uses are frustrated, exhausted, irritating, etc. We noticed that she doesn’t whine as often anymore because we understand her better, and she can communicate clearly.

Teach empathy.

We live in a world where we thrive with other people, and each one has his or her own story. We always remind Zeeka that before reacting to a certain thing or deciding on an action that would affect other people, she has to think whether this will affect the other person in a good way or bad way. Although, we also teach her what her rights are and what are the things and values that she should stand up for.

Value and Money

We are slowly teaching her how money works and how to grow it. Although at this stage, more advanced types of investments may be too hard for them to absorb, we taught her the concept of “interest” already.

We are also slowly teaching her also about “value”. What people may see as invaluable, may be valuable for other people.

Overall, these are some of the things that we feel will make her a successful when she decides to start her own business in the future. I know that we haven’t really cascaded a lot yet, but we’re taking our sweet time and we’re enjoying these moments of passing on learnings and experiences to her. She’s quite an inquisitive little lady! haha!

How about you, moms & dads, what other values and things do you teach your kids? Feel free to share it with us!

One of the coaches that I have complete trust on is Mr. Jon Orana. This 2019, he’ll be running a Lifestyle Entrepreneur Summit.

It’s so appropriate that he used the term Lifestyle. Being a successful entrepreneur means know how to manage your LIFE, too. It’s not all about earning profit or selling to customers. A big chunk of an entrepreneur’s life is about developing and managing yourself and your time, about having an appropriate mindset that will make you sail through this journey and having a concrete and clear enough reason why you want to start your own business.

That’s why in this summit, the speakers will show you different ways to build an online business so you experience time freedom, financial freedom, & personal freedom.

I highly recommend that you attend this summit if…

  • You want to learn from experts and practitioners in their own fields and industries
  • You wan to live a life of FREEDOM — freedom from STRESS from not being to be able to do the things that you love the most and freedom from traffic (haha!)
  • You want to have clarity in terms of where you want to go and what you want to do as an entrepreneur.
  • You want to meet other like-minded individuals

The good news is you have a chance to join one at the 2019 Lifestyle Entrepreneur Summit.

And even better is the Php 2,000 discount for the event is still up for grabs. Use this promo code: ginger (All lower case)

Get your tickets here.

It is the ONLY business summit where we prioritize lifestyle over profits.

See all details here. See you there!

I was filling out a survey for Fintech companies in the Philippines, and one of the questions there was how old each founder was. In the tech industry, there are a lot of young founders, so I find questions like these to be awkward. Obviously, there was nothing wrong by them asking that question, since it was a survey and they need data. It was my own mind that was making uncontrollable judgements. haha! It was my own self telling ME that it’s too late to start a business. I’m in my late 30s and I just seem old to be starting these very millennial-ish business.

Because of the voice inside me that was telling me to feel ashamed about my predicament, I decided to write about the PROs why it’s never too late to start a business. It can seem scary to start a business at an old age. But, it does offer a lot of advantages. Take for example Harland Sanders, who started Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) at 65 years old and became successful. At an old age, you have a bigger network and gained more experiences and knowledge. You also have more tenacity to make your business venture a success.

A bigger network

At 40s and up, you have already met many people during your professional career. You have already built stronger connections with peers and colleagues. You know who among them are reliable and trustworthy. Tap into their expertise and call them up in case if you need legal, financial, and marketing advice.

A wealth of knowledge and experience

When you’re older, you have gained more experiences and knowledge. You have been through many jobs and experienced failures. These guide you to make better decisions. By this time, you have gained more business acumen and expertise in your craft. Those learnings build you to become more prepared in your business venture.

More tenacity

You are more responsible to handle problems as they arise. You can make a firmer stand on important business decisions. You don’t easily lose heart in the face of problems. You understand that it takes patience and determination to make your business venture a success.

What are the business opportunities for you?

There are a lot of business opportunities for you. All of the things mentioned above make you more likely to succeed even. What really stops you are all of those personal judgements that you make on yourself. No one thinks that! So every day, wake up feeling capable. Each day, tell yourself that you can make things happen.

Believe that it’s not too late to start a business.

As a small business owner, we need quality work but at the same time, something that would be affordable while building our business. We also value relationships. We want to work with suppliers and entities who get us and who we see have the same vision and values as ours. In Manila Workshops, we have been creating workshops for aspiring and current business owners and freelancers. For our events, we need photographers and videographers that we can partner with. We were lucky enough to have met When Worlds Collide!

Today, I am very honored to feature Julianne Caparos and her soon-to-be-husband Timothy Fernandez from When Worlds Collide!

The Story of Julianne Caparos of When Worlds Collide

Most of my childhood years was spent in Dubai then at the age of 13 my family and I then moved to Botswana, Africa, then moved back to the Philippines to study and eventually work. Since I was young, my dad loved taking photos using his SLR (film camera), and I’ve always loved art. Because of that, I got interested in photography and wanted to pursue it, initially as a hobby and not as a business.

Then back in 2014 when I was still working at Smart, I met Tim and he wasn’t the type of person who was into photography. But when we became a couple, he supported me and my hobby in photography. I was that girl who would take photos before eating and taking photos of every corner when travelling. On our first date we went to the Mind Museum, because Tim liked museums and I wanted to take photos inside (haha!). At one point we thought of creating a blog but that drained us out; it wasn’t fun for us. Then eventually, families and friends would ask us to cover their birthday events until the point we got our very first Client.

Julianne and Timothy of When Worlds Collide

When Worlds Collide is actually our sideline business, for now we both still have full time day jobs. Hopefully in 2 years time, I can do it full time already.

when Worlds Collide

Interview with Julianne of When Worlds Collide:

Ginger: What is your Startup/brand/business?  What is it about? How long have you been in business?

Julianne: When Worlds Collide is a photography business. It actually started out as a blog because we thought it was a way to do what we love, which is photography but we realized we didn’t enjoy the writing part of blogging lol! More on capturing that moment already says a lot for Tim and I. Then my best friend decided to tag me along with one of her photoshoot gigs and that’s when we realized how much we enjoyed it and that was just last September 2016.

Ginger: Who is your target market? Why did you choose this market? Can you give us the insight behind this market?

Julianne: Our target market would be young families who just started raising kids. We chose this market, specifically for me, is because I love kids and their every reaction is just priceless. These days everyone is pretty much tech savvy and thanks to technology we can treasure every moment that we have through digital photographs and that’s one of our main goals, to provide a photo keepsakes for our clients.

Ginger: How did you come up with this idea? What made you decide to start this kind of business?

Julianne: Well, it just started out as a hobby but after that push we got last year, we decided to give it a try with a couple more photoshoot gigs and see how it would go and so far it turns out to be great.

Ginger: Were there any obstacles that you faced when you decided to pursue becoming an Entrepreneur? What are these?

Julianne: A lot! lol! It was fun but at the same time difficult. Difficult in terms of handling different clients and their expectations. The biggest obstacle probably was getting people to trust our services at the beginning, which I guess is normal for all.

Ginger: What are the greatest challenges in putting up and maintaining a business in your country?

Julianne: Greatest challenge with our type of business is competing with others in the same business. Other than that meeting the budget of various clients.

Ginger: What are three traits that you think an Entrepreneur/Startup Founder should have when starting their own business?

Julianne: “Courage” to start your business, “patience” especially with Clients, along the way you’ll learn how to handle different situations and “passion” because without it, I feel a business would never succeed.

Ginger: Unforgettable moments or  lessons that you learned as an Entrepreneur/Startup Founder

Julianne: The very first shoot I did and got paid, that was definitely an unforgettable moment. The biggest lesson I learned? bargaining our rates with Clients. At first it was difficult to say “nope our rates are fixed” thinking that we wouldn’t get any clients that way, but I had to be firm and along the way we lost Clients because we didn’t meet their budget. However, we also did gain a new base of Clients who trusts our services so far.

Ginger: What advice can you give to other Entrepreneurs?

Julianne: Our advice to other aspiring Entrepreneurs is to make that first leap, you’ll never if your dream business will work if you don’t take action. As to Entrepreneurs who are just starting out just like Tim and I, don’t give up, you will get a lot of praises at the same time unsatisfied Clients but you’ll learn on how to improve and become more successful.

Ginger: Do you believe that everyone should become entrepreneurs?

Julianne: I think everyone can but not everyone should become entrepreneurs. You need to love what you do and not feel like it’s a routine or pushing yourself just to make ends meet.

Ginger: What are ways that you can do to raise capital?

Julianne: In a photography business, your main investment are your gears. We started just last September 2016 but we started buying our gadgets as early as 2014, all from the money we make from working at our 9-5 day jobs and and sometimes from our parents who are ever supportive.

Ginger: How do you market your products? Growth strategy?

Julianne: Through Facebook groups, word of mouth and at times through xdeals with other Entrepreneurs who are just starting out. Our long term plan is actually to have an office space already, probably a studio but for now my goal is to further enhance my skills in this business.

Ginger: What are tech tools that you use for your business?

Julianne: Facebook and our website to promote and communicate with our Clients. Lightroom, After Effects and wetransfer/dropbox for editing and transferring of files.

Ginger: Thank you so much, Julianne, and of course to Tim, too! Thank you for supporting Manila Workshops and I hope you continue to inspire and grow your business! 

 

Contact information of When Worlds Collide:

Website: http://whenworldscollide.ph

Email address: whenworldscollideph@gmail.com

Mobile Number: 09178368418

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/whenworldscollidephotography/

I am an avid fan of Shark Tank. I love watching Start-up pitch their ideas, even if some are super unprepared. I love seeing the different ideas that people have. Man, there are a lot of unique and creative ideas. I love taking note of the judges questions and I am always amazed at how good they are with numbers. I think Shark Tank is the only show that I watch where I have my notebook by my side to actually take down notes. You may laugh at me (haha!) but I do learn a lot from this show.

In my mind, the end goal really of the start-ups joining the show is either to raise capital (which is pretty normal) or to gain enough publicity to build traction. And for the rest of us watching the show, it’s really for our entertainment and education. Anything that I could learn from, I love!

Imagine my delight when I was invited to the Final Pitch press conference. I didn’t get to go (because I had to focus this week on Taxumo, but I decided to share it anyway. The Final Pitch is something like Shark Tank. The show will challenge entrepreneur contestants in every way — from exploring funding options, refining their business plans, and marketing their products and services. The show is set to air on History Channel this May, 2017

creator-of-the-final-pitch-john-aguilar-2

“The Final Pitch aims to help entrepreneurs find success by connecting them to investors who can finance them, and to mentors who can fine-tune their businesses—reducing risk factors and boosting growth potential and sustainability,” shares the creator and host of The Final Pitch, John Aguilar.

The show will make entrepreneurs go through a series of challenges that will test their creativity, motivation and character. At the same time, they will learn the secrets behind the success of their potential investors, who are also tasked to handpick the top finalists to proceed on the show.

L-R The Final Pitch creator John Aguilar, venture capitalist Jose ‘Jomag’ Magsaysay, CEO of MFT Group of Companies Mica Tan, Chairman and CEO of the Sterling Group of Companies and SL Agritech, Dr. Henry Lim Bon Liong, and Chairman and CEO of Catala Corporation Joseph Calata

L-R The Final Pitch creator John Aguilar, venture capitalist Jose ‘Jomag’ Magsaysay, CEO of MFT Group of Companies Mica Tan, Chairman and CEO of the Sterling Group of Companies and SL Agritech, Dr. Henry Lim Bon Liong, and Chairman and CEO of Catala Corporation Joseph Calata

For Jose ‘Jomag’ Magsaysay, founder of a well-loved global food brand and one of the investors on ‘The Final Pitch’, his picks for the show would be based on whether or not he can see them as future business partners. “I’m looking for people who deserve a break, as I believe in the person more than the business,” he shares.

self-made-billionaire-and-the-youngest-to-become-the-chairman-of-a-publicly-listed-company-in-the-pse-joseph-calata

Other investors include the multi-awarded Chairman and CEO of the Sterling Group of Companies and SL Agritech, Dr. Henry Lim Bon Liong; self-made billionaire and the youngest chairman of a publicly-listed company in the PSE, Joseph Calata; and lastly, 25-year old millennial CEO of the angel investing group MFT Group of Companies, Mica Tan.

In addition to the potential funding from the investors, contestants will receive business coaching from an esteemed lineup of mentors, who are composed of well-known business experts and inclusive business champions, namely Department of Trade and Industry Secretary, Mon Lopez; former President of MicroVentures, Inc., Senator Bam Aquino; Chairman of Start Up Village, Prof. Jay Bernardo and; President of the Ateneo Center for Entrepreneurship-Masters In Entrepreneurship (ACE-ME), Dr. Andy J. Ferreira, among others.

I think this is a good initiative, because (1) Filipinos need to see that there are a lot of opportunities out there — opportunities to solve problems, opportunities to innovate and opportunities to make a difference; (2) We need to stir up the start-up ecosystem in the Philippines and having more publicity for the entire industry is good (in that way, we, startups won’t have to explain what we actually do, especially to our friends and parents. haha!);  and lastly, (3) We need to strive to be better than we are and let go of that “okay na ako” attitude. We, Filipinos, are very talented individuals and it’s such a waste to see people full of potential not maximize their talents and skills.

So there, these are the reasons why I, personally think, that we need shows and other activities like this. Will we join this competition and represent Taxumo? Maybe. We will have to think about it! haha!

But for those who are ready to join, here are some details:

To join The Final Pitch, applicants will be required to fill up and submit an online entry form to The Final Pitch via its official website www.TheFinalPitch.ph Deadline for submission of entries is until March 17, 2017. Investors interested in becoming a part of the show or investing in the entrepreneurs behind the scenes may also get in touch with The Final Pitch through through its website.

*The Final Pitch’ is produced by Streetpark Productions Inc., the company behind the longest-running real estate and construction TV show Philippine Realty TV. For more info and for sponsorship and partnership inquiries, visit www.TheFinalPitch.ph or call 0917-8136674.

Goodluck to all my readers who want to join! Message me so that we can all watch you!